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TOURING USA 2019

5-19 Oct

Proudly presented by KMBAevents & MaronRprod

in partnership with Cheryl Stone & Associates and

Lula Washington Dance Theatre

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TOUR DATES 5-19 OCT

Dance Classes

Featured Events

Evolution Dance Studio NoHo

Sounds of Blackness

Sounds of Blackness || Africans in America

Saturday 5th October

Showcase 8-10pm

Barnsdall Art Park

4800 Hollywood Boulevard

Los Angeles, CA 90027

Sunday 6th October
Workshop 11:30am-1pm

Animo Western Middle School Gym
12226 South Western Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90047

EVOLUTION STUDIOS
Address: 10816 Burbank Blvd,
North Hollywood, CA 91601
Phone: (818) 754-1760

LIMIT 25 PER CLASS!!
 

FRIDAY 11th OCT ||
6PM-7PM
7PM-8PM

SUNDAY 13TH OCT ||
2:10PM-3:10PM
3:20PM-4:20PM

4:30PM-5:30PM
 

FRIDAY 18TH OCT ||
2:10PM-3:10PM
3:20PM-4:20PM

4:30PM-5:30PM

Lula Washington Dance Theatre

Taste of Soul

Taste of Soul || Dance All Day

Saturday 19th October

Lula Washington Dance Theatre Stage

Crenshaw Boulevard

Los Angeles, CA 90016

LULA WASHINGTON DANCE THEATRE
Address: 3773 Crenshaw Blvd,
Los Angeles, CA 90016

Phone: (323) 292-5852

SATURDAY 12TH OCT ||
3PM-4:30PM || LWDT Students +
Non-registered students
5PM-6PM || Professional Dancers

6PM-7PM || Open Community

B O R N and R A I S E D in Reunion Island, Katy Toave is a formidable custodian of MALOYA.


Katy has been able to give voice to her passion as the lead vocalist with SIMANGAVOLE, an all female Maloya group who embody the spiritualism, regalia, dance and rhythm of the small island off the coast of Madagascar that holds a distinct fusion of French colonialism alongside African, Indian and Malagasy slavery.

She has toured worldwide with her dance and music and is a strong advocate for womens rights and the struggles of oppressed peoples worldwide.

Dance

An example of a Maloya Dance class, led by Katy Toave, lead performer in Simangavole.

Participants will be taken through a class of 1hour, learning the fundamentals of Maloya. 

The will connect the music and rhythm of Maloya to the fusion of its Creole link, a meld between African and Indian roots.

Origins

The indigenous music and dance form of Maloya was often presented as a style of purely African origin, linked ancestral rituals from Africa ("service Kaf" and Madagascar (the "servis kabaré"), and as such a musical inheritance of the early slave population of the island.

 

More recently, however, the possible influence of the sacred drumming of the Tamil religious rituals has been introduced which makes Maloya' heterogeneous African Malagasy and Indian influences more explicit.

Traditional instruments include:

  • roulér - a low-tuned barrel drum played with the hands

  • kayamb - a flat rattle made from sugar cane tubes and seeds

  • pikér - a bamboo idiophone played with sticks

  • sati - a flat metal idiophone played with sticks

  • bob - a braced, struck musical bow

Maloya was forbidden by the French Government until the seventies because of its strong association with Creole Culture and its expression as protest. 
 

The Catholic Church violently disapproved because it was used in servis kabare ceremonies, in which participants say they enter a trance and come face to face with their ancestors.

Performances by some maloya groups were banned until the eighties, partly because of their autonomist beliefs and association with the mantra of the Communist Party. There are known artists in the community who were imprisoned for practicing Maloya however,  in 2009, Maloya was inscribed on the Representative list of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity of UNESCO.

MALOYA
For Everyone